Fighting Against Mineral Depletion

Fighting Against Mineral Depletion

Fighting Against Mineral Depletion

Fighting Against Mineral Depletion

No-till farming. No-till farming (also called zero tillage or direct planting or pasture cropping) is a way of growing crops from year to year without disturbing the soil through tillage. No-till is an agricultural technique which increases the amount of water and organic matter (nutrients) in the soil and decreases erosion. It increases the amount and variety of life in and on the soil.
Karr says, “Heavy tillage of soils adds oxygen which accelerates the decomposition of soil organic matter and increases in the release of nutrient elements. In soils with high levels of native soil humus, this “mining” of soil nutrients can occur over decades with little sign of soil exhaustion. Eventually, the humus content drops low enough so that it cannot supply enough nutrients to feed the crop. Nitrogen is usually the first element that is affected by soil tilling. Since primary soil minerals are not reservoirs of nitrogen, fertilization with nitrogen or rotation with nitrogen fixing crops (legumes) becomes necessary early on to maintain production.”
This is why when you go and purchase fertilizer for your lawn you purchase it with certain levels of N-P-K. N stands for nitrogen. This is why composting is so important.
He says, “In livestock operations the cycling of nutrients in the soil is also interrupted. Meat and dairy products are sold off-farm, so the organic material is not returned to the soil. In some areas large feedlots have replaced on-farm operations. Typically in large feedlots the manure is not returned to the farm. If the manure created is not returned to the farm, the nutrients contained are lost.”

468 ad