Blog

Health Benefits of MSM: Microflora

Posted by on Sep 24, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

Impact #2: Microflora In the late 17th century, a Dutch lens grinder lens grinder named Anton van Leeuwenhoek noticed a layer of white scum between his teeth. He mixed some of that gunk with rainwater and then placed it in his microscope. “I found, to my great surprise,” he wrote, “that it contained many small animalcules, the motions of which were very pleasing to behold.” What he was beholding was part of his microbiome, the trillions of microbial cells that cover the inside and outside of the human body. It is only recently that science is learning to understand and appreciate this complex ecosystem. In fact, and it should serve as no surprise to you, the government has launched an investigative project called the Human Microbiome Project. The results of this project, quite possibly, could change the face and understanding of medicine. The New York Times reports: The work is “fantastic,” said Bonnie Bassler, a Princeton University microbiologist who was not involved with the project. “These papers represent significant steps in our understanding of bacteria in human health.” Until recently, Dr. Bassler added, the bacteria in the microbiome were thought to be just “passive riders.” They were barely studied, microbiologists explained, because it was hard to know much about them. They are so adapted to living on body surfaces and in body cavities, surrounded by other bacteria, that many could not be cultured and grown in the lab. Even if they did survive in the lab, they often behaved differently in this alien environment. It was only with the advent of relatively cheap and fast gene sequencing methods that investigators were able to ask what bacteria were present. You might be saying to yourself, “Where do these microbial come from?” The microbiome starts to grow at birth, said Lita Proctor, program director for the Human Microbiome Project. As babies pass through the birth canal, they pick up bacteria from the mother’s vaginal microbiome. Babies born by Caesarean section, Dr. Proctor added, start out with different microbiomes, but it is not yet known whether their microbiomes remain different after they mature. In adults, the body carries two to five pounds of bacteria, even though these cells are minuscule – one-tenth to one-hundredth the size of a human cell. The gut, in particular, is stuffed with them. “The gut is not jam-packed with food; it is jam-packed with microbes,” Dr. Proctor said. “Half of your stool is not leftover food. It is microbial biomass.” But bacteria multiply so quickly that they replenish their numbers as fast as they are excreted. We know that many of you from Voice of Eden deal with, or have dealt with, various health issues. We believe it to be critical that you understand this part of your body’s function that could explain some of your health concerns and even aid in your recovery. Not only do the bacteria help keep people healthy, but they also are thought to help explain why individuals react differently to various drugs and why some are susceptible to certain infectious diseases while others are impervious. When they go awry they are thought to contribute to chronic diseases and conditions like irritable bowel syndrome, asthma, even, possibly, obesity. Wired magazine reported in 2011: We’re just beginning to learn the effects our microbiome has on us, but it’s clear that they can be profound. Certain species help digest food and synthesize vitamins; others guide the immune system. Medical researchers have linked obesity, heart disease, and anxiety to properties of the microbiome. In many cases, it’s not the individual species that seem to matter...

Read More

Health Benefits of MSM: Cell Health

Posted by on Sep 24, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

Impact #1: Cell health The human body has roughly 10 trillion cells. This article from Sciencedaily.com explains why each cell needs oxygen. Researchers at Johns Hopkins have discovered how cells fine-tune their oxygen use to make do with whatever amount is available at the moment. Too little oxygen threatens life by compromising mitochondria that power it, so when oxygen is scarce, cells appear to adjust by replacing one protein with an energy-efficient substitute that “is specialized to keep the motor running smoothly even as it begins to run out of gas,” says Gregg Semenza, M.D., Ph.D., a professor of pediatrics and director of the vascular biology program in the Institute for Cell Engineering at Hopkins. “This is one way that cells maintain energy production under less than ideal conditions.” A report on the work is in the April 6 issue of Cell. “Cells require a constant supply of oxygen,” Semenza says, “so it’s vital for them to quickly react to slight changes in oxygen levels.” The protein-swap is how they do it. In the mitochondria, the tiny powerhouses found in every cell, energy is produced by passing electrons through a series of relay stations called cytochromes until they eventually join with oxygen to form water. This final step is directed by the protein cytochrome coxidase, or COX for short. If electrons react with oxygen before reaching COX, they generate “free radicals” that can damage or destroy cells. The mitochondria are designed to produce energy without excess free radical production at normal oxygen levels. In short this means that if our cells don’t get enough oxygen then they begin to malfunction producing free radicals. Did you catch that second sentence? “Too little oxygen threatens life.” While this may seem intuitive, we tend to think that if we are breathing then we are getting enough oxygen. Getting air into your lungs safely is task #1. From there the lungs transport it into your blood stream and then into your 10 trillion cells. If your cells aren’t healthy or can receive the oxygen you will basically be suffocating your body at the most basic and elemental level. Casinos in Vegas are notorious for pumping pure oxygen onto the casino floors as it helps people feel alive and awake. We need oxygen. So how does sulfur fit into this? Well remember that sulfur is one of the few macro-minerals that transports oxygen right into the cell. It also makes each cell wall more permeable for other nutrients. Hypoxia, or hypoxiation, is a pathological condition in which the body as a whole (generalized hypoxia) or a region of the body (tissue hypoxia, or less commonly regional hypoxia) is deprived of adequate oxygen supply. Variations in arterial oxygen concentrations can be part of the normal physiology, for example, during strenuous physical exercise. A mismatch between oxygen supply and its demand at the cellular level may result in a hypoxic condition. The signs and symptoms of hypoxia can vary between different people, and by how long the symptoms have been present. Some of them include: Dizzyness or fainting (syncope) Shortness of breath (dyspnea) Confusion, lethargy, and/or lack of judgment Headache Rapid heart rate (tachycardia) Elevated respiratory rate (tachypnea) Euphoria and a sense of well-being Tingling, warm sensations Lethargy is a feeling of weariness, tiredness, or lack of energy. We know that many millions of people lack energy. Could it be something so simple as lack of oxygen? The more oxygen you have in your cells the more alive you...

Read More

What does natural health medicine think of DMSO?

Posted by on Sep 24, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

Earthclinic.com says: DMSO has been associated with a number of therapeutic benefits, such as for the healing of wounds; its use as an anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-viral, and anti-fungal; softens collagen, helps eliminate hydroxyl free radicals in the body, stimulates the immune system, increases interferon formation, reduces the number of platelet thrombi, and is a potent diuretic. DMSO skin remedies are useful in treating topical fungal infections. Natural medicine uses Some of the benefits of DMSO include: Arthritis Sprains Strains Stroke Angina Heart Attacks Injuries of the Brain and Spinal Chord Infections Keloids Scars Burns Bruises Podiatry Eye problems Headaches Mental Disorders Genitourinary disorders   How does DMSO work? DMSO has a unique ability to pass through cell membranes. It can carry other drugs with it. Besides ferrying other drugs into the body it is used as an topical...

Read More

What does modern medicine think of DMSO?

Posted by on Sep 24, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

WebMD.com says: DMSO is a prescription medicine and dietary supplement. It can be taken by mouth, applied to the skin (used topically), or injected into the veins (used intravenously or by IV). DMSO is taken by mouth, used topically, or given intravenously for the management of amyloidosis and related symptoms. Amyloidosis is a condition in which certain proteins are deposited abnormally in organs and tissues. DMSO is used topically to decrease pain and speed the healing of wounds, burns, and muscle and skeletal injuries. DMSO is also used topically to treat painful conditions such as headache, inflammation, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and severe facial pain called tic douloureux. It is used topically for eye conditions including cataracts, glaucoma, and problems with the retina; for foot conditions including bunions, calluses, and fungus on toenails; and for skin conditions including keloid scars and scleroderma. It is sometimes used topically to treat skin and tissue damage caused by chemotherapy when it leaks from the IV that is used to deliver it. DMSO is used either alone or in combination with a drug called idoxuridine to treat pain associated with shingles (herpes zoster infection). Intravenously, DMSO is used to lower abnormally high blood pressure in the brain. It is also given intravenously to treat bladder infections (interstitial cystitis) and chronic inflammatory bladder disease. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved certain DMSO products for placement inside the bladder to treat symptoms of chronic inflammatory bladder disease. DMSO is sometimes placed inside bile ducts with other medications to treat bile duct stones. In manufacturing, DMSO is used as an industrial solvent for herbicides, fungicides, antibiotics, and plant hormones. How does it work? DMSO helps medicines get through the skin and can affect proteins, carbohydrates, fats, and water in the body. Modern medicinal uses The medical community says it is: Effective for: Bladder infections (interstitial cystitis) when used as an FDA-approved product. Possibly Effective for: Decreasing nerve pain caused by the herpes zoster virus (shingles) when used with a drug called idoxuridine. Inflammatory bladder disease. Treating skin and tissue damage caused by chemotherapy when it leaks from the IV. Medical Studies on DMSO Study Name: Dimethyl sulfoxide in treatment of inflammatory genitourinary disorders. Shirley SW, Stewart BH, Mirelman S. Study Findings: Intravesical dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) has been used in the treatment of 213 patients with various inflammatory conditions involving the lower genitourinary tract, including intractable interstitial cystitis, radiation cystitis, chronic prostatitis, and chronic female trigonitis. Significant symptomatic relief has been achieved in the majority of patients so treated, and no systemic or local toxicity has been noted. There are some 2000+ studies involving DMSO. Itʼs benefits and risks are still not fully...

Read More

The Facts about DMSO – Dimethyl sulfoxide

Posted by on Sep 24, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

What is DMSO? Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is an organosulfur compound with the formula (CH3)2SO. It penetrates the skin very readily, giving it the unusual property for many individuals of being secreted onto the surface of the tongue after contact with the skin and causing a garlic-like taste in the mouth. As DMSO reacts to the ozone in the upper atmosphere it can pick up an extra oxygen molecule thereby making DMSO2 or MSM. Where does DMSO come from? Like MSM, DMSO originates in the oceans where microscopic plankton release sulfur compounds into seawater. This Plankton is quickly converted to DMS, a volatile sulfur compound that escapes into the atmosphere. In this suspended, gaseous state, the DMS reacts with ozone and ultraviolet sunlight to create DMSO and DMSO2, known as MSM. MSM then falls to the earth with the rain, where it is collected and concentrated in plants and subsequently...

Read More

How Does MSM Work?

Posted by on Sep 24, 2013 in Blog | 0 comments

How does MSM work? Sulfur is one of the few elements that transports oxygen right into your cells. This process makes the cell walls more permeable. This is extremely important for cells as some elements need in, like oxygen, and some toxins need out, like heavy metals. Bioavailability Ingested MSM enters almost all tissues of the body within 24 hours of its oral ingestion. Most unused or metabolized MSM is excreted from the body within 96 hours of its ingestion (although some MSM remains in the body for up to 400 hours (16 days) after its ingestion. MSM is excreted from the body primarily via the Urine. Lesser amounts are excreted via Saliva, exhaled air and Perspiration. Are MSM and Organic Sulfur the same thing? Yes and no. The answer really comes down to how it is made. MSM can either be made via distillation or crystallization. Even Dr Mercola weighs in on the issue of distilled vs crystalized. For MSM, distillation is by far superior. But crystallization is less expensive, and a lot less energy-intensive. According to Mr. Benjamin, only two companies that produce MSM use distillation. Mr. Benjamin explains why you should consider a product that has been purified using distillation. “A lot of the problems with [crystallization] is youʼre essentially crystallizing it out of a parent solvent or liquid. If there are any impurities, which could be salts of heavy metals, you could have aromatic hydrocarbons in that… Itʼs actually the parent solvent. Itʼs usually water. It is dependent upon water quality.” We choose to use the term Organic Sulfur as MSM can indicate anything that is chemically Methylsulfonylmethane regardless of how it is made. Organic sulfur either comes from plants and animals or from a high-quality distilled...

Read More